OlympicThe Olympic Cauldron comes to life. Images courtesy of BBC News

Olympic Cauldron Comes To Life

Designer Thomas Heatherwick provided an awe inspiring feat of design and engineering which topped what was already a dazzling opening ceremony, at the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Thomas Heatherwick Olympic Cauldron 2012Thomas Heatherwick designer of the London 2012 Olympic Cauldron. Image courtesy of the BBC

Thomas Heatherwick designer of the London 2012 Olympic Games cauldron described his concept as being a 'non-cauldron' cauldron. The cauldron was formed in the stadium by giving all the participating countries a small humble object (a copper petal) which when brought together created a symbol of the 204 nations coming together in peace. Each 'petal' was inscribed with the name of a country and XXX Olympiad London 2012.

The cauldron delighted a global audience with it's spectacular closing flower form. It has been designed to be dismantled so that the participating nations can take their 'petal' back to their home soil when the games finish.

Olympic Cauldron 2012Olympic cauldron 'petals' at the FCT Flames studio in Australia. Image courtesy of Trade Australia

It's always interesting to see behind the scenes. For this project the fabricators involved were based in two different continents. The copper 'petals' made by panel beaters in Harrogate in the North of England and the FCT Flames based in South Australia. FCT Flames specialise in fabricating olympic cauldrons and have been involved in several olympic games in the past.

Olympic Cauldron 2012Staff at FCT Flames test the Olympic cauldron 'petals'. Image courtesy of Trade Australia

Olympic Cauldron 2012Staff at FCT Flames weather test the Olympic cauldron 'petals'. Image courtesy of Trade Australia

Olympic Cauldron 2012Olympic cauldron copper'petals'. Image courtesy of LOCOG

Olympic Cauldron 2012Olympic cauldron copper'petals'. Image courtesy of LOCOG

Olympic Cauldron 2012Olympic cauldron supports and burners. Image courtesy of LOCOG

Olympic Cauldron 2012Olympic cauldron base. Image courtesy of LOCOG